Questions and Answers on Affordable Housing and PILOTS (Payments in Lieu of Taxes)

In March 2015, The New Jersey Supreme Court issued a mandate that all municipalities develop a plan to meet their Constitutional third round COAH obligations to provide a realistic opportunity for Affordable Housing.

The courts made clear that municipalities that failed to submit a plan would face Builders Remedy suits and the potential for large developers to come into their municipality, ignore our zoning and master plan, and develop ANY parcel in the Township with 9-10 market rate homes for every affordable unit.

In a July 2015 Declaratory Judgment, Hopewell Township certified that it would meet its COAH obligation and committed to develop a preliminary Affordable Housing Plan by December 8, 2015.

The Planning Board held seven extended public meetings in Summer and Fall 2015 to develop an Affordable Housing Plan, including potential sites and the number of units per site they were willing to zone for.

After being reviewed and accepted by the Hopewell Township Committee in a unanimous, bipartisan vote, this matrix was filed with the Courts on December 7, 2015 and the Courts granted the Township Committee’s request for an extension of immunity from Builders Remedy Lawsuits.

In early 2017, New Jersey Superior Court Judge Mary C. Jacobson started a two-phase trial in Mercer County to determine each municipality’s current AND prospective obligation for Affordable Housing for the third round period (1999 to 2025).

Parties in this trial included Fair Share Housing Center (FSHC), a non-profit that emerged as a strong presence in the lawsuit.

FSHC promulgated its own standards and methodology , which supported inclusionary housing – meaning mixed affordable and market rates like we have in Brandon Farms, and, for Hopewell Township, an obligation of 1,756 affordable units.

This could have led to over 17,000 total new housing units in Hopewell Township.

Hopewell Township reached a negotiated settlement with FSHC and most of its intervenors in July 2017, which the Court validated via a Fairness Hearing on August 28th and a Compliance Hearing in December 2017.

Click HERE to read answers to questions you have asked us on the Township's affordable housing litigation.

Click HERE for the Hopewell Township calendar.

Click HERE to sign up for Township electronic notices.

Click HERE for information on the availability and management of affordable housing for sale in Hopewell Township.

Click HERE for a link to Hopewell Township's affordable housing department.

In March 2015, The New Jersey Supreme Court issued a mandate that all municipalities develop a plan to meet their Constitutional third round COAH obligations to provide a realistic opportunity for Affordable Housing.

The courts made clear that municipalities that failed to submit a plan would face Builders Remedy suits and the potential for large developers to come into their municipality, ignore our zoning and master plan, and develop ANY parcel in the Township with 9-10 market rate homes for every affordable unit.

In a July 2015 Declaratory Judgment, Hopewell Township certified that it would meet its COAH obligation and committed to develop a preliminary Affordable Housing Plan by December 8, 2015.

The Planning Board held seven extended public meetings in Summer and Fall 2015 to develop an Affordable Housing Plan, including potential sites and the number of units per site they were willing to zone for.

After being reviewed and accepted by the Hopewell Township Committee in a unanimous, bipartisan vote, this matrix was filed with the Courts on December 7, 2015 and the Courts granted the Township Committee’s request for an extension of immunity from Builders Remedy Lawsuits.

In early 2017, New Jersey Superior Court Judge Mary C. Jacobson started a two-phase trial in Mercer County to determine each municipality’s current AND prospective obligation for Affordable Housing for the third round period (1999 to 2025).

Parties in this trial included Fair Share Housing Center (FSHC), a non-profit that emerged as a strong presence in the lawsuit.

FSHC promulgated its own standards and methodology , which supported inclusionary housing – meaning mixed affordable and market rates like we have in Brandon Farms, and, for Hopewell Township, an obligation of 1,756 affordable units.

This could have led to over 17,000 total new housing units in Hopewell Township.

Hopewell Township reached a negotiated settlement with FSHC and most of its intervenors in July 2017, which the Court validated via a Fairness Hearing on August 28th and a Compliance Hearing in December 2017.

Click HERE to read answers to questions you have asked us on the Township's affordable housing litigation.

Click HERE for the Hopewell Township calendar.

Click HERE to sign up for Township electronic notices.

Click HERE for information on the availability and management of affordable housing for sale in Hopewell Township.

Click HERE for a link to Hopewell Township's affordable housing department.

We have endeavored to answer the numerous questions we have received on Affordable Housing over the past three years on this site.  Please see our frequently answered questions section above.  

If we have missed something, or you have an additional question, please feel free to submit it in the box below. We will continue to update this page and add additional answers and other pertinent information on Affordable Housing and PILOTs to this page.

For additional information, please check our resource guides available for download from this site or from HERE.

A friendly reminder that all questions and other posts on this page are subject to our rules of etiquette.  Let’s work together to promote a civil dialog and to build a stronger Hopewell Township.

Questions and Answers

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