Got ticks?

'tis the season for your tick check!

Use this handy tool to identify ticks. Scroll over the pictures to magnify to photos.

Deer ticks take 2 years to complete their life cycle and are found predominately in deciduous forest. Their distribution relies greatly on the distribution of its reproductive host, white-tailed deer. Both nymph and adult stages transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, Babesiosis, and Anaplasmosis.

American Dog ticks are found predominantly in areas with little or no tree cover, such as grassy fields and scrubland, as well as along walkways and trails. They feed on a variety of hosts, ranging in size from mice to deer, and nymphs and adults can transmit diseases such as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Tularemia. American dog ticks can survive for up to 2 years at any given stage if no host is found. Females can be identified by their large off-white scutum against a dark brown body.

If the tick has not attached, it can easily be removed with tape (or a sticky lint roller). If it has attached, remove carefully with pointy tweezers. Click HERE to see a helpful video.

Special thanks to the Sourland Conservancy for bringing this important information to our attention! Like them on Facebook.

'tis the season for your tick check!

Use this handy tool to identify ticks. Scroll over the pictures to magnify to photos.

Deer ticks take 2 years to complete their life cycle and are found predominately in deciduous forest. Their distribution relies greatly on the distribution of its reproductive host, white-tailed deer. Both nymph and adult stages transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, Babesiosis, and Anaplasmosis.

American Dog ticks are found predominantly in areas with little or no tree cover, such as grassy fields and scrubland, as well as along walkways and trails. They feed on a variety of hosts, ranging in size from mice to deer, and nymphs and adults can transmit diseases such as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Tularemia. American dog ticks can survive for up to 2 years at any given stage if no host is found. Females can be identified by their large off-white scutum against a dark brown body.

If the tick has not attached, it can easily be removed with tape (or a sticky lint roller). If it has attached, remove carefully with pointy tweezers. Click HERE to see a helpful video.

Special thanks to the Sourland Conservancy for bringing this important information to our attention! Like them on Facebook.